Many of us battle eye allergies and it can be a frustrating problem for some. Eye allergies, or allergic conjunctivitis, present themselves in the form of itchy or red eyes and tearing or burning eyes. We often think of treating nasal allergies but ignore our eye allergies.

There are many different allergy triggers, like pollen, grass, pet dander, mold or dust mites. Even cigarette smoke or diesel exhaust can trigger eye allergies. So, when it comes to treating your eye allergies, what can you do?

Tips for managing your eye allergies
  • Keep your windows closed during high pollen periods
  • Use air conditioning in your home and car
  • Wear glasses or sunglasses outdoors to help protect your eyes
  • Use “mite-proof” bedding to help limit exposure to dust mites
  • Wash your hands after petting an animal
  • Use artificial tears, decongestant eye drops and oral antihistamines

If these tips are not able to control your eye allergies, it may be time to see an allergist for a prescription medication. If you have more questions about maintaining your health, contact Marion’s eye doctor. Our team would be happy to speak with you.


image credit: parrchristy on flickr

When our children are young, it can often be difficult to determine when to take them to the eye doctor. But it is important to make sure they are see by an eye doctor to make sure that any potential issues can be addressed. For this, we’ve compiled a list of tips so you’ll know when it’s time to take your child to the eye doctor.

When To Take Your Child To The Eye Doctor
  • When your child’s eyes don’t line up, eyes appear crossed, or one looks out
  • Eyelids are red-rimmed, crusted or swollen
  • Eyes are water or inflammed
  • When your child rubs their eyes a lot, closes or covers one eye, tilts or thrusts head forward
  • If your child squints or complains of things being blurry
  • If your child says their eyes itch or after doing close-up work they complain of dizziness or nausea

Children don’t always understand what’s going on with their bodies, so it’s important that we help them where we can. If you have questions about your child’s eyesight, contact Marion’s Royal Oak Eye Care team, we’d love to speak with you.


image credit: Donnie Ray Jones on flickr

We all go swimming in pools and most of us think nothing of it. We know that chlorine is present and it really becomes more of an irritant to our skin afterwards than anything else. But we wanted to take the opportunity to let you know that chlorine can impact your eyes and it may not be in a way you think.

Chlorine is used in swimming pools as a great way to control bacteria and to prevent pathogens and disease from spreading. However, when your eyes are submerged in a chlorinated pool, the film of tear across your eyes to protect it is washed away. This means that your eyes are no longer protected from dirt of bacteria. This is important because chlorine cannot entirely eliminate all bacteria or dirt from a pool.

The result, if you’re a pool swimmer, you could possibly be exposed to eye infections like pink eye. Chlorine can also dry your eyes out and leave them red and itchy. Using eye drops can help to restore the tear film needed to protect them. If you wear contacts, make sure to remove them before you swim, but if you do not, make sure to take them out and rinse them immediately following your swim. Goggles are also a great way to protect your eyes if you’re going to be in the pool for some time.

If you have more questions about eye health and chlorine, contact the Royal Oak Eye Care team. We’re here to help protect your eyes!


Certain nutrients can help delay or prevent eye problems and disease. Some over-the-counter supplements have not been tested in clinical studies. Ask your doctor to be sure.

Look for these nutrients, in at least these amounts, if not already prescribed by your doctor:

  • Vitamin C, 250mg
  • Vitamin E, 200mg
  • Beta-Carotene, 5,000 IU
  • Zinc, 25mg
  • Zeaxanthin, 500mcg
  • Selenium, 100mcg
  • Lutein, 10mg
  • Calcium, 500mg
  • Thiamin, 2mg
  • Folic Acid, 800mcg
  • Omega-3 essential fatty acids (including flax-seed oil), 2,000-3,000mg
  • N-acetyl cysteine, 100mg
  • Alpha Lipoic Acid, 100mg



Diabetic Eye Disease:

  • Can cause severe vision loss or blindness
  • Diabetic Retinopathy: Damage to the blood vessels in the retina
  • Cataract: Clouding of the lens of the eye
  • Glaucoma: Increase in fluid pressure inside the eye that leads to optic nerve damage and loss of vision

The leading cause of blindness in American adults is the most common diabetic eye disease, Diabetic Retinopathy.

  • Caused by changes in blood vessels in the retina
  • Some retinal blood vessels may swell and leak fluid
  • Some may grow on the surface of the retina


  • No pain
  • Vision may not change until disease becomes severe
  • Blurred vision, when macula swells from the leaking fluid
  • If vessels grow onto the surface of the retina, they can bleed into the eye, blocking vision

Symptom-less progression is why regular eye exams for people with diabetes are so important.



Here is a “Master of the Obvious” statement: Overall health includes your eyes. At least that would seem obvious. But when it comes to overall health, many Americans neglect their eyes.  The World Health Organization says that 85% of visual impairments can be avoided.

Read the full article here:

The answer? Routine eye exams. You should see your eye doctor once a year.

If you have questions, contact the Royal Oak Eye Care team. We’re here to help.